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20120901
20120930
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
in baltimore. but romney continues his push on national securityish shies at an event at a military college in pennsylvania tomorrow. that is a state where he is trailing the president according to recent polls. but it's one the campaign thinks it could put into play, wolf. >> why do they think that? the polls have been very lopsided in pennsylvania not just recently but for weeks and weeks. >> they've looked at that state for some time. they think it's something they could put in play. obviously they know it would be an uphill battle because in recent elections that state has been pretty solidly blue. but, wolf, i have to tell you even though these recent battleground polls have shown romney falling behind in places like ohio and florida, if you look at the attitude of the campaign, they are showing no worry, no concern. they are confident they will make up ground during the debates and this will still be a tight election come election day. >> still plenty of time to go. three debates. a lot can clearly happen. i haven't seen the romney folks put a lot of money in advertising in pennsylvan
of the aisle hope the refs lockout ends soon. this after a disputed field goal gave the baltimore raven a one-point win over the patriots and a series of botched calls and misapplied rules that have driven coaches, players and fans crazy. all this because of a labor dispute between the nfl and its regular referees that began when the league locked out the refs in june. the referees want more money, asking for more than the nfl's offer to increase their average salaries from $149,000 a year to $189,000. compare that to the median nfl player's salary, $770,000 a year. it's important to remember the average nfl playing career is only three and a half years. and most of the refs have other careers. so these aren't full-time jobs for them. the nfl wants to make the refs full-time and to add more refs so the average referee would make less money. the league also wants to move them from a pension systeto a 401(k). but in the context of a business that brings in $9.5 billion a year, it seems relatively solvable. red cashin, an nfl referee for 25 years through two super bowls doesn't blame the replace
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)